TEJO REGION

The Tejo region is located in the very heart of Portugal, a short drive from the capital city of Lisbon. Pulsing with a rich heritage, Tejo claims a bounty of historical treasures scanning the pages of time, from Roman ruins and Gothic castles, to Manueline monasteries and medieval hilltop villages. To the Portuguese, Tejo is known as the land of vineyards, olive groves, cork forests, Mertolengo cattle, and the famous Lusitano horses.

Viticulture has deep roots in Tejo and it is heralded as one of the oldest wine producing regions in the country. Vineyards have graced the banks of the Tejo River (Tagus in English) since Roman times, and the influence of past grape-growing cultures is evident in the many architectural relics dotting the landscape.

Formerly known as Ribatejo, since 2009 the region has now simply been called Tejo, a tribute to the river that has defined its landscape, climate and economy for centuries. The river can also be credited for shaping the distinct Tejo terroir, making the surrounding plains and riverbanks an ideal terrain to cultivate Portugal’s native grapes.

Terroir

The terroir of the region is deeply defined by the very nature of the Tejo River. The river's breadth and strength elementally impact the soil and climate of the region, producing three distinct wine-producing zones: Bairro, Charneca, and Campo.

Terroir

The terroir of the region is deeply defined by the very nature of the Tejo River. The river's breadth and strength elementally impacts the soil and climate of the region, producing three distinct wine-producing zones: Bairro, Charneca, and Campo.

Terroir

The terroir of the region is deeply defined by the very nature of the Tejo River. The river's breadth and strength elementally impacts the soil and climate of the region, producing three distinct wine-producing zones: Bairro, Charneca, and Campo.

Wine Traditions

Tejo's long history of winemaking is evident in the numerous wine traditions that remain at the heart of the region's vineyard and cellar practices.

History & Culture

History & Culture

History & Culture

 
1170
 

Winemaking in the Tejo region dates back to 1170, before the founding of the Portuguese kingdom. During the Middle Ages, land concessions required trustees to plant both olive trees and vineyards on the land parcels.

1400
1400

During the Age of Discovery (c.1400), Prince Henry the Navigator, ordered Portuguese explorers to travel the trade routes from Europe through Africa and the Middle East. Departing from the Tejo river’s estuary at Lisbon, ships were packed with Portuguese wine and other supplies to give sustenance to the mariners on their long journey.

Prince Henry was also a successor to the Knights Templar, which was based in city of Tomar located in the foothills of the mountains of the Serra de Aire at the northern-most edge of the Tejo region.

1400
1400
1600
1600
1600

By the 1600s, the Santarém District was developing economic importance, as it became the major supplier of goods bound for Lisbon, from ships sailing the Tejo.

1836
1836

Portuguese royalty has been present in Tejo for centuries and many of the suppliers to passing ships were agricultural estates owned by the monarchy. The vast Companhia das Lezirías estate was founded in 1836 by the Portuguese Crown, led by Ferdinand II. Now state-run, the estate is home to agricultural farmland, bird sanctuaries, cork forests and vineyards.

1836
1836

Regional Highlights

Easily accessible from Lisbon, the unspoiled Tejo region - on the banks of the grand Tejo River - blends history, culture, and tradition with winemaking. Here are some highlights:

Contact

WINES OF TEJO, PORTUGAL OFFICE

Rua de Coruche, No. 85

2080–094 Almeirim

Portugal

TEL: +351 243 309 400 

FAX: +351 243 309 409 

EMAIL: geral@cvrtejo.pt

www.cvrtejo.pt

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